Duck Reach Power Station

The start of the Duck Reach Power Station walk
The start of the walk is at the start of the first suspension bridge that goes over Launceston Gorge
Duck Reach Power Station track
On the Duck Reach Power Station track, a naturally formed arch
Well constucted paths on the Duck Reach Power Station walk
20mins into the walk you will reach this lookout
Launceston Gorge - Duck Reach Power Station walk
Launceston Gorge
Track directions at the lookout 20mins into Duck Reach Power Station walk
The track develops some speed humps after leaving the lookout and heading closer to Duck Reach Power
Well formed track - Duck Reach Power Station
The track - Duck Reach Power Station walk
Descending at the end of the track before getting to the suspension bridge
Heading towards the end of the track before crossing the suspension bridge to Duck Reach Power Stati
The suspension bridge to Duck Reach Power Station
Directions on Duck Reach Power Station walk
Warning sign - Duck Reach Power Station walk
Descending from the track towards the suspension bridge to Duck Reach Power Station
The beginning of the suspension bridge at the other side of the river to Duck Reach Power Station
Crossing over the suspension bridge to Duck Reach Power Station
The flying fox situated at the Duck Reach Power Station, no longer operational
Outside of the Duck Reach Power Station building
Information - Duck Reach Power Station
Inside of Duck Reach Power Station
Ruins of the chief engineers home
Ruins of the chief engineers home
Outdoor bath at the chief engineers home, I don't think it's meant to be outdoor ;-)
The inside ruins of the chief engineers home
The ruins of Chief Engineers house of Duck Reach Power Station
The ruins of the chief engineers home of Duck Ridge Power Station
Peacock - Launceston Gorge
Baby Peacock
Peacock - Launceston Gorge
Launceston Gorge

Overview

 

Region: North East

 

Location: Launceston

Where: 10 minutes drive from Launceston

Walk time: 1 hour

Walk distance: 3km

Difficulty level: Easy

5 August 2017

Friday night I drove up north towards Launceston to stay the night with plans for the Saturday to do a walk and check out what the north of the state had to offer. Saturday morning came round and I opened the blinds to see a very grey and drizzly winters day outside.

Not the ideal day for a walk so I headed out to brunch with some friends and had an amazing eggs benedict and coffee.  After a scrumptious feast it was time to head back outdoors into the murky weather but alas, the sky was blue and the sun was out so on went the hiking boots and a short drive later I had arrived at the Launceston Cataract Gorge.

I decided to park at the top of the gorge to avoid the parking metres at the front.  It was only a 5 minute walk down to the starting point of Duck Reach Power Station.

The first 15 minutes of the walk to the lookout over the gorge is pram friendly, after the lookout the track starts to go uphill and has a few speed bumps along the track.  If you have a good pram you may be able to take it all the way along the track however on the decent towards the suspension bridge there are quite a few steps.

As you enter onto the suspension bridge you walk through a medieval looking archway and before long you are at the other side of the bridge next to the old building that once housed a flying fox which was the only way to get back and forth across the Esk river before the bridge was built.

Next to that sits an old industrial style building which houses Australia's first Hydro-Electric station.  The doors are open welcoming you to go inside and explore and also read about what once was.  The power station began construction in 1895 and finally shut it's doors in 1955.

Duck Reach Power Station was the first Hydro-Electric station in the world's southern hemisphere.

After marvelling the inside of the building we made our way back across the suspension bridge and instead of going left back towards the start we decided to take a detour and went up the hill to check out the ruins of the home that once housed the Chief Engineer of Duck Reach Power Station, C. St. John David. The home was burned down in 2011.

We then traced our steps back to the beginning of the track and made our way back to the car passing some friendly peacocks along the way.

TIPS:

- You can park in the main car park but there is a fee, if you want to avoid the fee park up the top of the gorge and walk down.

- There is a restaurant and café at the gorge along with a chair lift should you decide to take in an aerial view of the gorge.

 

TAGS: Lookout 

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